The Quantum Art Meetup Met…

Now its time to launch some rockets and simulate nuclear propulsion!

Micah Tinklepaugh
4 min readMar 18, 2023
“Short Gas Core Rocket” (https://skfb.ly/6YOM6) by dogmaticpyrrhonist is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

First, there is this author named Tim Denning who I think is always encouraging writers to use their true voice. I got the impression he just pounds out words and publishes. And today he sent out an article about putting out energy to create one’s own energy.

So without thinking much, I’m gonna try a bit of his method.

Second, a big thank you to the Association of Computing Machinery and Andrew Conklin for sponsoring out meet. As you know I’ve been researching open source software tools from NASA and toying with the idea of using quantum computing to simulate nuclear propulsion and deep space missions.

This month we had the first successful Quantum Art meetup.

It was a small success! On the table you can see the Estes rockets for the rocket launch this Sunday.

Now the focus of going to a rocket launch is just to go through the basics of rocketry to acclimate myself so I can get to nuclear propulsion. So instead of getting really good at model rockets, I’ll ask veterans with years of experience to share their wisdom. And I’ll also take comfort that they have insurance for the event and FAA permission to launch to 5000 feet.

Here I’m showing my first Estes Rocket that I’ve built and a 3D printed rocket someone gave me. The rock is unenriched Uranium Ore. The drone is to capture the liftoff, if the experts give me the ok.

So what is next? Well, I said I’d publish Quantum Art methods to the association of computing machinery. So I’ll write a title for my paper due in 12 months something like,” How to use visualized quantum computing for deep space missions planning in tandem with NASA’s open source software”

Heck, I’ll even put in a plan to apply for a NASA grant. Technically I have done this so it isn’t my first rodeo. Also, I have submitted a research topic to a nuclear organization so this is not out of the realm of possibility.

Before I get started on all that — let’s do a fun Chat GPT search to see what research exists on using Quantum Computing to Simulate Deep Space Mission including Nuclear Propulsion. Some results:

  • “As of my knowledge cutoff in September 2021, there isn’t any specific research available on using quantum computing to simulate nuclear propulsion in cislunar space and beyond.”
  • “Quantum computing has been investigated for optimizing space mission trajectories, including travel to the Moon, Mars, and other celestial bodies. For example, researchers have explored using quantum computing to solve the traveling salesman problem in the context of space exploration.”

Ok, so the area hasn’t exactly been researched a lot. That is good. Smarter people have yet to catch on to me! Or saner people who prefer not to use their Friday nights writing for free. This article is free because Tim Denning suggested alternating paid vs non paid in publishing online strategy.

I’ve got some next steps but I just wanted to try this whole off-the-cuff thing on for size. Tim was right. It did give me energy. Maybe there is such thing as free lunch? My physics professor always suggested the opposite. But he also owned a boat. Boats are a lot of work. So what did he know? ;).

Sidebar: If you have a PhD or are just more knowledgeable than me I’m definitely open to being corrected and learning from your expertise. If something seems off — say something! If you are with the Department of Defense and are wondering why I have Uranium — please come knock on my door. I’d like to ask you for a job!

Now if any of you are wondering if I did reach out to the Washington DC Quantum Meetup as I said I would — I did! They had a dynamic circuits presentation that made me realize how very little I know about anything. I sent their leader a message but as you can imagine his attention is in high demand. So I will continue building this momentum and one day I will hear back.

In the mean time — you might enjoy this read! (Don’t do this at home, I’m not. That what computers are for! We can simulate it people!

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Micah Tinklepaugh

I design products for people and systems. I also like to swim, bike, and run.